Tag Archives: converter

Testing the TPS61092 Boost Converter

For my current project I searched for a good boost power converter which is able to deliver continuous 400mA power for various sensors.

There are an endless number of good boost converters around, but not many can be hand soldered to a board. I would really like to see some like the TPS61092 with SOIC or similar packages. The biggest problem seems to be the heat transport, why most chips have to be mounted flat on the board.

Before using the chip in my project, I created a small test board. Using this board I can test various things. First I liked to test the performance under load. Next I tested if the chip can be hand soldered and finally I tested the final board layout I will use in my project.

Performance

The performance of this chip is really good, producing a very stable output. I designed everything for a load up to 2A with all suggested components from the specification. There will never be a higher load than 0.5A, so I probably could use a smaller coil for the final project.

thermal image

Running under 0.5A load from 3.3V for over half an hour, the chip stays quite cold. Even in my case, where the chip bottom is not directly soldered to the board, it seems to be able to transfer the heat into the board. This is nicely visible in the thermal image of the board.

The Board

lucky-resistor-1

The board was produced by OSH Park in a good quality. If you like to experiment with this chip, you can order this board very cheap at OSH Park using the following link.

Continue reading Testing the TPS61092 Boost Converter

Open Position for Step-Up Converter

For a current project I need a step-up converter to get 5 volts from 2.5V-5.5V input. The output of this converter is used to power sensors which drive motors and small heat elements from this source. The average consumed current is 160mA with a peek at 320mA.

In the photo you can see the latest Boldport project with a test setup for the XC9142B50DMR-G from Torex Semiconductor. I made the mistake and just relied on the specifications stated on the website from Mouser:

mouser-info.png

This looks really good: 500mA output current… So I did a quick test. Obviously the magic smoke in the photo is a composition, but this is what actually happened somewhere at a constant ~250mA load with 5V input. Continue reading Open Position for Step-Up Converter

Convert Bitmap Fonts for LCD Displays with Style

Update 2015-09-05: Added a example font and Adobe Photoshop template.

Currently I am working on the deluxe version of the data logger. This version has a LCD screen and capacitive buttons to control the software. The Adafruit library for the display is quite large and almost uses the whole RAM, because it is a pixel oriented library. My own implementation is a text only library using 8×8 pixel characters. This simplify everything and reduces the RAM costs.

Usage

To convert the bitmap font into bytes, I wrote a small application for OS X (minimum version 10.10). It accepts a PNG image with the characters in it and converts it into bytes with the correct bits set.

FontToBytes Screen 1

First you select the mode on the left side of the application window. In this example the mode is set to “8×8 Fixed Top-Down”. Select the output format in the bottom left corner of the window.

Now drag your font file onto the area on the right side. If the dragged file is accepted, the window turns blue.

Continue reading Convert Bitmap Fonts for LCD Displays with Style